Dance Music of the Third Reich…

Aha, somebody has been featuring ‘Charlie and His Orchestra’ on television or radio I thought, judging by the sudden increase in sales for Tomahawk Film’s album of the same name…but whom I wondered..? I had recently sent a review copy up to a BBC contact of mine who I know is thinking about producing something on the phenomenon that is Third Reich military music… but this was too early in his creative process to have actually been aired!

Then I got a confirming e-mail from a customer ordering one of our Charlie CDs in which he exclaimed that he was somewhat surprised to see BBC 4 including the subject of Nazi music in a Swing documentary at the week-end!! Happily, I was able to respond that this is not something new, for ’Auntie’ has recently included some of the Reich’s finest music in its programming output, not least on BBC Radio Two a short while ago, when some of our archival material got a very welcome & rather popular airing:

The late Malcolm Laycock, (who presented a really superb late night swing & jazz show on Sunday evenings, of which I was a great fan), contacted us here at Tomahawk a few years ago after we had released 4 further albums of Third Reich civilian music to say he was interested in acquiring those titles for his own collection: Lale Andersen, Wilhelm Strienz and Zarah Leander.. but particularly our Dance Music of the Third Reich which featured the music of Barnabas von Géczy, who was incidentally, Adolf Hitler’s favourite civilian band-leader.

He also asked if it would be possibly to air a track or two from this latter album on his Sunday show, if we were agreeable? Agreeable!…with an audience measured in the many millions, what a wonderful shop-window for Tomahawk’s Archival CDs… and to play to such a knowledgeable & learned audience as those that regularly listened in to his wonderful late night Radio Two Show…

But what of this particular album of German Dance Music that Malcolm was so keen to acquire? Well there were a total of 93,857 professional musicians under contract across Germany when the Third Reich came into existence in 1933 and by war’s outbreak in 1939 this number had grown to a staggering 172,443, thanks to Propagandaminister Joseph Goebbels realising the power that music and radio had on a population; and  within a year of the Nazis coming to power, he had personally taken charge of this vital propaganda tool for the German government, which eventually led to some 5 million German homes receiving state radio broadcasts across the Reich..!

Goebbels skilfully & successfully balanced the world of entertainment with the field of politics and by 1938 light entertainment music, (Unterhaltungsmusik), accounted for nearly two thirds of all music output across the Third Reich and German radio was very popular for its willingness to play the latest dance records… and by war’s outbreak in 1939, the number of listeners had risen to 10 million!

In fact the demand for Unterhaltungsmusik grew so much that Goebbels actually ordered more of it to be played and broadcast to the ever growing radio audience… and so it was that this very talented Hungarian musician, Barnabas von Géczy (1897-1971), already an accomplished band-leader & violinist in 1930s’ Berlin, took a starring role in this wonderful musical renaissance that was taking place across the Third Reich.

As the personal favourite of Adolf Hitler, Barnabas soon became a Nazi favourite across the Reich, leading his own talented orchestra & dance-band and by 1941, over 50 million listeners were tuning in to his highly popular broadcasts. So Tomahawk Films were delighted when, after many months of searching, we located a 78rpm schellack record collection of Barnabas von Géczy’s most popular music in Dachau… and even more delighted when, one dark winters’ night some months later, we heard the lively & joyous ‘Kautschuk’ happily bursting forth from our radio, courtesy of Malcolm’s fabulous show on BBC Radio Two…

Copyright @ Brian Matthews 2013

‘Channel Islands Occupied’ TV Documentary…

When I originally travelled to the Channel Islands in the early 1980s on what would be just the  very first visit in what was to eventually become a wonderful life-time connection with this stunningly beautiful part of the world, it soon became apparent to me that a TV documentary about the German Occupation of those British islands between 1940 and 1945 just had to be made..!

Back then, according to the many islanders I talked to, plenty of people had arrived with ‘big plans’ for such a film, but nobody subsequently put their money where their mouth was to came up with goods and so, determined not to be just ‘another film-maker wannabe’ full of idle promises made to these lovely, warm, island folk that I had met and been welcomed by, on my return to the mainland I immediately set about contacting as many UK TV network stations as I could with my outline plans.

Quite amazingly, (or should that be ‘outrageously’?),  I was utterly surprised to get a swift rebuff from every one of the commissioning editors I spoke to, all of whom seemingly could not actually get their head around this simple concept, with one actually saying ‘this story is of no possible interest to us!!’.  Though of course given the way television executives today simply look around them to see what everybody else is doing and then commission identical shows for their own network, these days you can’t move for tripping over such documentaries about the islands’ German occupation, particularly on the satellite channels where repeats of same are seemingly aired wall-to-wall these days!

However I do feel vindicated all these years on that I was the first of the modern generation of producers to actually get off my backside and do something for the Channel Islanders’ hitherto ignored story on film. I also feel very happy that my subsequent decision not to let down those wonderful people to whom I had promised faithfully that I would try to tell their story on screen was ultimately the right one..and one that would also lead to some unforeseen but wonderful ’fringe benefits’ later on in the wake of my television documentary.

I have to admit that though it actually took the re-mortgaging of the roof over my head (literally), in order that I could keep my word and raise almost all of the necessary funds to return to the islands to shoot my documentary as planned, (despite having no network TV commission to act as a safety net for my financial outlay, it also being pre-satellite TV channel days as well), I knew it was the right decision to make, both morally & financially… and I will always remember the look of relief on our bank manager’s face when the film was later judged a success, both historically & financially..!

(I think mine must have been something of a picture too, knowing that my house was still my own rather than Barclays’!!)

At this point I would wish to pay fulsome tribute to a most honourable gentleman, Major Evan Ozanne, who back then was the much respected deputy-director of Guernsey Tourism whom I met with during one of my research trips to Guernsey. I had asked the Tourist Board if I could, out of natural courtesy, outline my plans to them for filming on their beautiful island and Major Ozanne, an ever gracious former army officer, invited me to lunch, during which I explained how I intended to tackle the telling of this incredible war-time story…

However, this was not a pitch as Tomahawk’s plans were already underway, (albeit it we were several thousand pounds short of our required budget), and even though, to a certain degree, I was ‘winging things’ and constantly doing mental gymnastics in my head as to how I would complete the documentary when inches short of the required funding, I’d given my word to my Guernsey supporters who, when I asked how could I repay them, simply answered: “don’t worry about us son, just get the story right and we’ll be happy”… so after that incredible generosity of spirit, my documnetary had to be produced.. somehow!!

After a most enjoyable lunch during which I was able to happily forget all about the thorny issue of finances for a wee while and enjoy talking about the beautiful island of Guernsey and all it had to offer, there came a short silence… at the end of which Major Ozanne quietly mentioned that he liked my plans,  though he could not get involved with financing our project as such, (something I genuinely hadn’t even considered after my terse rebuffs from the UK’s TV commissioning editors).Then came the ‘big however’:  it was the end of the his financial season and he had £2,000 left in his budget…  would having that help us in any way..?

Help us..? Holy Moly, that was almost the sum short down to the last penny!  I could not believe my ears and, truly, the Gods were shining down on me; but when I recovered my composure I gratefully accepted this incredible life-line, (or rather almost bit his hand off in truth!!), and agreed with Major Ozanne that in return we would sub-title our film ‘The Official Guernsey Liberation Documentary’ which he kindly accepted most happily… and within months I was back over with my crew filming as planned!

So were it not for this incredible show of support from Major Ozanne and the Guernsey Tourist Board, (though he modestly says he didn’t contribute much, £2,000 then was a huge amount..!), I doubt very much if my film would have got off the ground… or if it had, based on the fact I was still short of my original budget despite remortgaging my house, I would not have enjoyed the process as much as I did for worrying about how to pay for everything!

So as I now look back, I’m so pleased that I ‘bit the bullet’ and went ahead and shot the film as it also led to a lifetime of treasured friendships within the islands, not least of all with Mrs Molly Bihet, author of the popular book ‘A Childs War’ and who is both one of the stars of my documentary and our agent on Guernsey, (and lovingly referred to as ‘my Guernsey mum’), and of course with Major Ozanne who I’m also privileged to call: my good friend Evan’...

It was this burgeoning friendship that led to a wonderful period of my life as I was invited back to Guernsey some years later by Evan to work as a media consultant to the Guernsey Tourist Board and its exciting German and Victorian Fortifications initiative: ‘Fortress Guernsey’ which I blissfully undertook for a number of years…and as a result I now consider the Bailiwick to be ‘my second home’..!

During my tenure I was commissioned & authorised to write, (and broadcast on radio), about Guernsey’s German occupation history, to regularly seek, out, invite and personally guide parties of selected journalists & magazine feature writers around the Bailiwick. This thoroughly enjoyable work also afforded me a superb opportunity to actually ride shot-gun’, (on behalf of the Guernsey people), on new films & documentaries that were slowly and subsequently beginning to also be shot in the islands, to ensure that the correct historical story would also be continued to be told on camera to the outside world and that no liberties would be taken with the islanders or their incredible war-time stories.  Some very professionally fulfilling years indeed, it has to be said!

Sadly changes within Guernsey Tourism meant this initiative was eventually discarded, but thankfully the work that Evan & I began was enthusiastically adopted by a fantastic group of the Bailiwick’s occupation enthusiasts who, from their own pocket, continue the detection, preservation and on-going promotion of some of Guernsey’s most amazing German military fortifications under their organisational name of Festung Guernsey’.

However most importantly for my original ‘gamble’ is the fact that, eventually written & produced back in 1989, my particular telling of this utterly fascinating occupation story in Tomahawks’ 50’ television documentary, ‘Channel Islands Occupied’ is still selling in good numbers today, (formerly on video and now on DVD), as well as it ever has and is particularly popular in a number of leading tourist outlets in the Channel Islands of Guernsey, Alderney and Jersey.

With sales now in excess of some 33,000 copies sold, (plus a couple of transmissions on regional television ‘after the event’ and also via Canadian Broadcasting), many people think they know the voice-over artiste..but just can’t place his name..! Well I’m happy to tell you it was/is a certain Alan Dedicote esq… perhaps better known as ‘Deadly’ from Sir Terry Wogan’s much-missed former BBC Radio Two Show..!

Recorded in the years before I become a trained television voice-over artiste in my own right, (otherwise I would ‘rudely’ have pushed my way to the front to do it), Alan is still a superb newsreader, (and in fact I think the senior continuity-announcer) at Radio Two in London whilst also being the National Lottery’s televised ‘Voice of the Balls’. Alan kindly agreed to narrate our commentary back then, courtesy of a request via a very talented producer friend of ours, Dirk Maggs, who formerly worked alongside Alan at Radio Two.

This was a bit of a coup as, unknown to me, Alan was the continuity ‘voice’ for BBC Radio Guernsey and also for the Plymouth-based local BBC TV news programme that broadcast to the Channel Islands… I’d love to say I knew that at the time and this was a master-stroke of production planning, but it was a pure fluke that it all tied in so nicely..as did so much around the time of my researching my story and Tomahawk’s ultimate shooting of this fascinating war-time documentary on Guernsey & Alderney…

Richard Heaume MBE, owner of the German Occupation Museum, still shows a 20′ looped highlight version of our documentary in the little cinema he has built. Often it’s fun to quietly slip into one of the back seats when I am in the Bailiwick and eavesdrop on positive comments made by visitors to this world-class museum as they sit watching our work on the screen..!

I know you shouldn’t, (as there is always the possibility of hearing something you wish you hadn’t), but happily all we’ve heard are smashing compliments… and who knows, one day one of those commissioning editors that dismissed me out-of-hand might have a gap amidst their on-going merry-go-round of repeats which they could fill with the first TV documentary to take a detailed look at this compelling episode in Britain’s war-time history..!

In so doing they would be giving a welcome airing to some very rare interviews that Tomahawk Films captured with Channel Islanders, (such as the larger-than-life Frank Stroobant who survived the rigours of the World War Two German Occupation), but which sadly are no longer around for today’s new generation of producers to similarly document on camera…. here’s hoping..!

Copyright @ Brian Matthews 2013